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Getting through wine o’clock

July 24, 2014 904 comments

Late in the afternoon is often the hardest time. How do you get through the witching hours without drinking?

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904 comments

  1. 3 sober days so far this year. Have been stuck in a rut – a bottle of wine every night to alleviate stress.
    Starting the living sober today. Focusing on how good I will feel – no more nausea, stomach cramps and headaches. Plus all the money I can save.

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  2. Some say not to think about the bad things – but that’s what keeps me going. Not wanting to repeat the inevitable when I drink. Someone else wrote this but it rings true with me – Even though I loved drinking during the cooking hour, I did NOT love how the rest of the night typically went which was me creating a scene with my husband and then passing out. I think about this every night that I’m cooking dinner.

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  3. I made the decision this morning to get myself help with this disease. reading your posts is like reading all about myself. it gives me courage to hear your stories and i am amazed that others have had the same experiences. i am told the sober me is an awesome person but the drunk me has pushed away those that are dearest to me. i am determined to be that sober guy everyone wants, espcially i owe it to my beautiful wife and son. thank you all for sharing.

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  4. If you struggle for reasons not to drink use medication called Antabuse. It gives you a huge hangover if you drink. So when you’re thinking ‘should I have a drink’ it’s a pretty good reason not to. Only 5% of alcoholics can give up alcohol without medication. Are you one of the 5%? Are you really??

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  5. Hi, I am new to this site. I am 47yrs old and alcohol has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. First getting drunk at 9yrs old. As a teenager and early 20′s I would binge drink, blackout and wake up to hear the horror stories of the way I behaved. Now I seem to be more tolerant and don’t necessarily get drunk that often but drink daily, usually about 7 standard drinks per day. A mixture of beer and wine. I have attempted to give up many times and have only managed once many years ago for about 5 months. I now have health problems related to my drinking where I get painful attacks of gastritis. Still, I find it difficult to go a day without drinking. I am ready to try again but it is soo hard. Thought I would try some online groups such as this to help support me.

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  6. Hi, I am new to this site. I am 47yrs old and alcohol has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. First getting drunk at 9yrs old. As a teenager and early 20′s I would binge drink, blackout and wake up to hear the horror stories of the way I behaved. Now I seem to be more tolerant and don’t necessarily get drunk that often but drink daily, usually about 7 standard drinks per day. A mixture of beer and wine. I have attempted to give up many times and have only managed once many years ago for about 5 months. I now have health problems related to my drinking where I get painful attacks of gastritis. Still, I find it difficult to go a day without drinking. I am ready to try again but it is soo hard. Thought I would try some online groups such as this to help support me.

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  7. In the beginning days of sobriety, I found the only way to get through “booze o’clock” was to start getting ready to attend an AA meeting the moment I arrived home from work. I had to get ready immediately because this was normally the time I would start drinking. I am very fortunate to live in an area where there is a meeting every day of the week. This also made it possible to attend 90 meetings in 90 days. My addiction was (to me) so severe that I had to do it the AA way as it was the only place that understood My insanity and I could recognise that same insanity in other peoples stories.
    Now 12 years on with no relapses I still cannot drink anything out of a glass that would normally be used for alcohol. For example wine glass, beer glass. My favourite drinks are just coffee or water with a drop of lime juice.
    For me, I have to keep it simple. It may seem extreme and a lot of hassle but my life today is so wonderful without alcohol that it easy to do this as part of my ongoing recovery. Kia kaha.

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  8. I’ve been working with a life coach over the last 6 months (career development, personal growth, that sort of stuff).
    Ironically the alcohol issue didn’t re-rear its head fully until after I had finished my sessions, so we never did anything specific surrounding that. A lot of the skills she taught me can be translated though, to do with my attitude and how I approach challenging aspects of my life.

    One of the strategies the coach gave to help lift my mood, and as a way of “shaking off” the day, is to have a mini dance party when I get home…. Sounds crazy and I felt silly the first few times but it really helps to lighten my mood and leave the stresses of work/life at the door.

    My instructions were to chose light, energetic music, whatever makes you feel upbeat. Put it on loudly and dance like no-one is watching for a few minutes. I inevitably end up enjoying myself and it’s good for getting the heart rate up and clearing the head.
    I usually leave the music on as I pour myself something refreshingly non-alcoholic drink and keep a little boogie on as I get dinner.

    (If you’ve got small children, they’ll love to get in on the action. If you’ve got teenagers, they’ll probably roll their eyes at you, haha…)

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  9. This is my plan. I used it when I gave up smoking years ago and it worked. I set myself one hour – all I have to do is get through one hour of not having a drink. So if it’s 6pm, about the time I would normally pour a wine, I say that all I have to do is get to 7pm and then reassess. When 7pm rolls around, I congratulate myself on getting to 7pm then set a new goal of 8pm. And so it goes. I also go to bed quite early and read or do Words With Friends, as I wouldn’t normally drink in bed. Or I iron or clean out cupboards. Any activity that doesn’t involve alcohol. I’ve also been known to pop to Jetts Gym at 11pm… xxx

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    1. This works for me as well – if I can truly get myself to wait that one hour (or sometimes just 15 minutes does the trick). Just the reassessment/delay seems to be a good strategy, and finding something else to do.

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  10. I am going to go to my sisters or friends after tea and I have to drive. I’m drunk now but having two sober days(mon/wed). I think I’m going to need help from you all

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  11. Yes, read the article in paper today. I have always had a low tolerance for alcohol, got lower as I got older. However I notice myself slipping back into it. I may buy wine, and tip some away to ensure I don’t drink it all. One glass out at dinner with friends is ok, but I start to drink at home, if I am angry, if I come home from a good night out and it does me no good and at mid 50′s I know it need to stop. I really have known for years this needs to stop and I have stopped for periods of time, but as I don’t drink that much ( tolerance) I convince myself it is ok, but for me it’s not, definitely not. So need to follow some ideas from wine oclock and surf the urge as written…. and and and

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  12. I find when the later afternoon creeps around and Im tired and want a drink, I need to get out and keep busy. Go for a brisk walk and just keep walking, pound the pavement to help get rid of the days stress otherwise I will sit down and pour one. Just keep active, keep busy. Then when I’ve worked up an appetite for dinner I don’t want to hang in the kitchen too much, otherwise I will drink while preparing dinner…I will heat up the dinner that was (pre planned from the morning or evening before) so its quick and easy and not too much cooking preparation. Don’t hang around the kitchen too long. Once I’ve ate then a small sweet dessert helps to take away the booze craving too. A nice hot bath…Then early to bed to help sleep off the nagging craving, so the morning will come faster and thats when you feel your best!!

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  13. i usually grab a glass of water and head to my craft room and make a card or two, it gets my mind off that awful debate going on in my head !!
    at this stage im still having interesting conversations with my mind … haha

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  14. Distraction with another activity. Gym. Eat. Sleep. Focusing on Now. Blogging on support site. Going outside. Watching TV. researching other sites for positive/inspiration support. Drinking water. Drinking Coke if I feel really bad. Chocolate. Talking to spouse. Crying.

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  15. Just keep thinking how proud you are waking up feeling clean. I’m a little further than you, day 48, but those times (late afternoon, after work and enjoying the outdoors) I would love my wine. I threw away my favorite stemless glasses and returned the unopened bottles of wine, so although there is still other wine for guests, my go-to habit was eliminated. I also think the thought that others have posted, which is l never wake up thinking “I wish I had had that drink .” Keep reading Mrs D, Unpickled, and tired of thinking about drinking, you will feel inspired and not alone

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  16. 4 Days no vino. I will keep going. Lost job nearly 1 year ago. 1 bottle of Vino per day. Gained 25 lbs. 4 days in with no wine and I feel good. Moody today. Skin looks clear. More energy. Need the support from others. Sometimes I miss the impulsiveness of it all. But, not going there.
    Thank you!

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